Faust - The History

We are all gearing up for our first night which is less than 3 weeks! In the meantime we have created this video which looks at the background of the Faust story. We hope you enjoy it.

The performance dates are:

Lines & Letters

  • Posted on: 27 April 2017
  • By: Jan Barger Cohen
Thinking with Pencil

To get my angles and lines and curves right I have drawn a more precise sketch on A4 graph paper, which I will enlarge to A1 and use as my guide when working on the wood. Drawing the letters on a curve is challenging - even though I was once a professional calligrapher, I expect the letters to be the hardest part. I've based my lettering on the Albertus font, which was in use in the 1940s when our production of Faust takes place.

Gounod's "Faust" - The Background

  • Posted on: 23 April 2017
  • By: Michael Withers

Taking a break from preparing the reduced orchestration for Faust I’ve been giving some thought to the background to the opera.

Charles Gounod had ambitions to compose an opera based on the Faust legend as early as the 1840s but it took a meeting with the well-established opera librettists Jules Barbier and Michel Carré in 1855 to crystallise the idea.

Charles Gounod 1859

Carré had already written a three-act play based on Goethe’s Faust, called Faust et Marguerite and it was this work that provided the basis for Gounod’s opera.

The opera was commissioned by Léon Carvalho the manager of the Théâtre-Lyrique with the proviso that his wife Caroline Carvalho would sing the role of Marguerite. Gounod finished writing the music in the autumn of 1858 and it immediately went into what turned out to be a very challenging rehearsal period.

The score that Gounod delivered contained far too much music for a normal evening at the opera so the rehearsals involved cutting many of the numbers and rearranging others to different places in the story. In all, about a quarter of the music Gounod wrote had been cut by the first performance. That wasn’t the end of the rehearsal issues; by the early dress rehearsal it had become clear that the tenor allocated to sing Faust wasn’t able to cope with the part and a replacement was brought in with only three weeks’ notice.

Théâtre Lyrique

In spite of the difficulties in rehearsal, the first run at the Théâtre Lyrique was successful and the work was soon touring in Germany, Italy, Belgium and England. When it was revived in Paris in 1862 it was a hit and, ironically, Gounod had to write extra music so that a ballet could be added as required by the Paris Opéra. The opera remains one of the most frequently performed operas across the globe.

The Faust story is best known from its retelling by Goethe but it is based on an older tales dating back to the fifteenth century.

The models for Faustus might have included Johann Fust, who was also Johann Gutenburg’s business partner, and Johann Georg Faust, an itinerant German alchemist, astrologer and magician, although there are many earlier legends about making a pact with the devil.

The first play based on the Faust legend was probably Christopher Marlow’s Doctor Faustus which was first performed around 1590.

The first opera based on the legend was Faust by Louis Spohr, written in 1816, and the most recent is probably Doctor Atomic by the American composer John Adams, which presents Robert Oppenheimer as a 20th century ‘Faust’. The Faust legend has been used by writers and dramatists as diverse as, Stephen King, Oscar Wilde, Alexander Pushkin, W.S. Gilbert and Terry Pratchett.

To book tickets please click here.

Thinking with Pencil

  • Posted on: 12 April 2017
  • By: Jan Barger Cohen
Thinking with Pencil

I have drawn my pencil sketch (on A5 paper) for the Golden Calf pub sign. I don't usually make thumbnails or lots of sketches because I generally 'see' a picture in my mind and then put that down on paper.

Here are some thoughts that went into my design:

  • Want it to look like a proper pub sign
  • Want the calf facing out, not in profile
  • I'll put the lettering at the top as an integral part of the design
  • The Golden Calf comes from the biblical story of Moses and the Ten Commandments. A tablet shaped arch around the calf will both hint at that and make the design more interesting.

Images & Inspirations

  • Posted on: 31 March 2017
  • By: Jan Barger Cohen

Rehearsals are going well for our May production of Faust. Cast and crew not only have music and moves to learn - we also have costumes and props to assemble.

Images and Inspiration

In a leap of faith (as I rarely do any large-scale work as an artist or work on wood) I have volunteered to paint an A1-sized sign for our on-stage pub, The Golden Calf (where the chorus seem to spend a lot of time!) and blog about my progress. I'll get my inspiration from images of cows and pub signs, then let ideas bounce around in my head until I know how I want to proceed with the design.

Faust box office is now open!

Tickets go on sale on 1 February for our May 2017 performances.  This year we will be taking Gounod's exciting interpretation of Faust to Brighton, Lindfield, Hurstpierpoint, Hassocks, Steyning and Uckfield and really hope you will be able to get along to see us.

The performance dates are:           

Merry Christmas and thank-you for a wonderful 2016!

  • Posted on: 18 December 2016
  • By: Dorothy Withers

Dear Supporters of Heber Opera,

As we approach the end of our first year under “new management” as it were we felt it appropriate to wrap up 2016 before moving on to our next production.

Pavilion

We have really appreciated all your support this year as we sought to take Heber forward under new management. In particular we would like to thank our new management team who have done sterling work without which we would not have been able to keep going.

So take a bow please:-

  • Chrissie Berridge – fantastic poster design, photography and blogging for the website, sourcing of props

  • Julie Emmerton – sourcing of material for and making of all costumes as well as personally tackling leaflet distribution

  • Sara Gardner – co-ordinating all front of house requirements and with husband Jon setting up seating at each venue and providing a raffle and refreshments

  • Jo Harper – setting up box office arrangements, updating e-mail listings and keeping supporters informed as well as being minute secretary for team meetings

  • John Hole – various press liaison, organising licenced bar facilities

  • Jenny Letton – Treasurer duties, organising printing of all advertising material, marketing and fund raising

  • Dave Roberts – for sourcing and booking all performance venues, managing and running the website

This is by no means a comprehensive list of what everyone does but we do sincerely thank them all.

The “Pearl Fishers” proved a huge success at the box office which was a delightful surprise and we really do appreciate everyone who bought tickets and came along.

It was not an easy piece and a hard sing for everyone but we hope you felt that we acquitted ourselves reasonable well.

Our soloists ( Sally Wilson, Nick Forest, Mike MacKenzie and Steve Hawksley ) are to be particularly congratulated on their individual performances.

We receive no funding or grant and everything we do is self-funded. All the singers pay a show levy and other vital funds are raised from various activities such as the recent “High Tea Concert”. This event was a sell-out three weeks before the concert and we had several people phoning up late in the day for tickets and being disappointed that they couldn’t get any. Obviously when we do a catered event we have to set a limit to the number of people we can accommodate so this just shows the importance of booking early!!

Other fund raising includes Craft Fayres ( organised by Jenny Letton ) and every December we are engaged by the Bluebell Railway to provide sessions of carol singing for their evening dinner train. This year we will have done 9 by Christmas Eve. Believe it or not some of us have been singing carols for the Bluebell Railway for approx 30 years now. It all started via a suggestion of Sara Gardner to the Bluebell catering team when the Christmas Dinner trains first started and has continued ever since.

Next year will soon be upon us and rehearsals for Faust start on January 8th.

If you have any active friends that sing and might be interested do ask them to get in touch – especially men!

Just because we had a virtual sell-out last year we are not complacent and will be working as hard if not harder to promote Faust so please do keep an eye on the website for details. Performances are the last two week-ends in May 2017 and booking opens in February.

Finally, we look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in 2017, hopefully at a performance of Faust or at one of our fund-raising events but meanwhile we wish you all a very Happy Christmas and sincere good wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year.

Michael & Dorothy Withers ( Music and Stage directors ) and all the Heber company.

A magical Christmas evening at the Royal Pavilion

  • Posted on: 18 December 2016
  • By: Chrissie Berridge

Working at the Royal Pavilion has its advantages! I was tasked with finding two choirs for our Christmas banquets, and I thought it would be great to give Heber Opera the opportunity. Singing in the spectacular Music Room (the Prince Regent's favourite room in this iconic building) is such an amazing experience, even more so with the room decorated in its lavish Christmas finery.

Pavilion

The Christmas banquets are very popular, and guests are treated to a drinks reception in The Great Kitchen followed by a short concert in the Music Room, before heading into the magnificent Banqueting Room for a three course meal. Everyone dresses up - sparkles, long frocks, and bow ties are the order of the evening. The event gives a glimmer of what life may have been like for those lucky enough to be invited when Prince George (later King George IV) was in residence.

Heber Opera didn't disappoint as they sang to the 90 guests, with Tim Naill at the keyboard and Michael Withers conducting. The repertoire included the magnificent choruses from Aida, and The Hebrew Slaves from Nabucco, as well as a cheeky little G&S number, before ending with the seasonal We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Solos came courtesy of Veronica Brookes, with a delightfully mischievous Don Giovanni duet from Andy Holden and Dorothy Withers.

With the audience led off to feast Heber packed up their scores, but the singing wasn't over for some. The evening was a Bluebell evening, so a good cohort sped up to Sheffield Park station to sing Christmas Cheer to a second lot of diners. It's full steam ahead!

The Royal Pavilion is open over the Christmas period (except Christmas Day and Boxing Day). The entire palace is wearing Christmas finery so do come and admire it with friends and family, and enjoy the beauty of its Music Room for yourselves.

A Feast for Opera Lovers!

  • Posted on: 4 December 2016
  • By: admin

When we planned the High Tea Concert I don’t think we had taken into account the fact that it was the first day of Advent so when we arrived to set up the hall ready for the ‘Tea’ it was lovely to find a Christmas tree and lights decorating the place which gave it a distinctive festive air.

​The last ticket to this event was sold three weeks before ‘curtain up’ so the first step was to display the ‘sold out’ notice by the main door. We were very sorry to have to disappoint our supporters who didn’t book in time (there’s a moral there, somewhere!) but with an event like this the catering and presentation of the hall were vital to its success.

​Jenny and Julie were bakers supreme having prepared a bountiful supply of cakes which were carefully arranged on stands assembled on the day. This exercise was interesting due to the vagaries of screw size versus holes but with the aid of Mike Mackenzie's screwdriver (never goes anywhere without it apparently!) the requisite number of stands were completed in time.

Several of the ladies of the company had been press-ganged into making sandwiches and these all arrived with their contributions which were duly plated up for each table. I think we were all “sandwiched out” by the time we got home!

​The first half of the concert went well and when guests were served during the interval they were entertained by the playing of ‘Double Duos’ the alter ego of some of our regular orchestra members.

​Despite the failings of the small water heater for tea making (in some cases size does matter) Dave and Liffy Carverhill still managed to produce 120 + cups of tea or coffee so no-one went thirsty.

On to the musical second half which again went well and an appreciative audience applauded our efforts and went home replete both with the music and food intake.

Although it was hard work for the company (preparing the hall and food, serving it and then clearing up afterwards) hopefully they felt it was all worth the effort as apart from the fund raising side of things we also made several new Heber friends who intend supporting our production of Gounod’s Faust next May.

Are you ready for the Burning Sands?

  • Posted on: 24 July 2016
  • By: Chrissie Berridge

Taste the summer as Liffey Carverhill offers up the secret of the Burning Sands cocktails, served to cast during the Pearl Fishers run. She says, “I had a few requests for the recipe for Week 1's cocktail. It begins as a precise science, but as many of you will have seen, it ends up with a bit of sloshing and tasting.”

Pearl Fishers Poster

Alcoholic mixture (chilled – use as much as needed!)

300ml dark rum

200ml coconut Bacardi

200ml Crabbies ginger wine

150ml Pisang (banana liqueur)

150ml limoncello

100ml litchi liqueur

100ml chili ginger vodka

Pineapple sludge (all mixed and frozen)

Pulped fresh pineapple (one of your 5-a-day)

1 can of coconut water

Tot of rum

Juice of a lime

Litchi sludge (all mixed and frozen)

Pulped tin of litchis and juice (another of your 5-a-day)

Glass of litchi liqueur

Bottle of Peach bellini

Cans of lemonade 

Cans of ginger beer

Bottle of Prosecco (optional)

Mint (another of your 5-a-day)

A bag of ice

 

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